In the Circle- My Love For The Game

Ever since I was five years old, the only thing I ever wanted to do was play Division I Softball. Softball was my life.

At the age of seven, I started pitching and never looked back. I loved the game more than anything. The goal I set for myself as a five year old to play Division I ball was achieved. On top of that, the past four and a half years I have been fortunate enough to stay involved in the sport of Softball by working at the Softball Factory. This sport has given me so many opportunities and the many people I have met in the game has been amazing.

In the Circle will give you a look into the many different parts of Softball and how much this sport impacts you not only on the field but more importantly off the field. Enjoy!

Girls…make sure to always thank your parents. I know you hear this all the time, but I want to make the first “In The Circle” blog about this topic. It is extremely important and something that many people take for granted. I know that growing up I did this at times, however, there is no way I would be where I am today without them.

My dad and I at seven years old on my 8 and Under Rec ball team.

As I mentioned, from a very early age I wanted to play College Softball. I remember when I was seven, I told my dad I wanted to start pitching because I was bored playing other positions. He asked if I would take it seriously because he didn’t want to spend the money on lessons if I didn’t want to practice or care about it. I said I wanted to, and from then on, I was set.

When I started taking pitching lessons, my dad became my catcher. He caught me every single time I needed to pitch. Looking back, those are some of the best times I had with my dad. On certain occasions, we would pitch at 6AM and find a field with lights on, because I knew that we couldn’t pitch later on in the day. Or we would pitch at 10PM before bed because I knew I needed to get a bullpen in. He never ever complained, whether the weather was freezing cold, or extremely hot, or if I wasn’t in the…best mood that day, he was a trooper and was always there for me.

I had been pitching for about a year, when I found out that my dad was diagnosed with Leukemia. As an eight year old, you don’t really understand what that means. In reality, it meant my dad would be in the hospital for 6-to-8 months and it would take close to a year for him to become 100% healthy. This also meant that the catcher I was used to having, wasn’t able to be there. Thinking of my dad not surviving never crossed my mind. Thankfully he beat cancer, and today is as healthy as ever. He actually just celebrated his 20th anniversary of being cancer free this past May.

Reflecting back, there is no way I would be where I am without him and the sacrifices he made. When I was in college and came home for holidays and the summer, my dad would wear full catching gear any time he caught me. It may have looked a bit funny to people walking by, but his response was always “Do you want to try to catch her?” I will cherish the moments and memories I had with my dad forever because they are some of the best times of my life.

When my dad was sick, my mom attempted to catch me. She caught me maybe….three times and then said I was throwing too hard. However, she was my biggest fan, biggest supporter, and knew more about what I was doing incorrectly pitching wise then sometimes I did. She came to all of my games (even if we had Nationals in the hottest places, or had seven games in a day, or had the 8AM game and we had to get up at 5 AM, etc…) She was a trooper through it all.

My parents and I at Mercer. I don’t know where I would be without them.

When I was 12 years old, my family got the news that my mom had Breast Cancer. That was a big shock and a hit to everyone in my family especially after everything my dad went through. This news was difficult since I was in seventh grade, and this time I fully understood what was going on. My mom like my dad is a fighter and has been cancer free for the last 15 years.

Through all of her treatments, she did whatever she could to make sure she was at my games. She tried to go to as many pitching lessons as she could, and tried to stay as involved as possible. I am her #1 fan and she is not only my mom, but my best friend.

Looking back on my career, I don’t know where I would be without the love and support of my parents. Not only are they my heroes, but they always supported my goals and dreams to play softball. They drove me everywhere I needed to go, never complained about not having a “real family vacation,” spent money on new equipment, travel team fees, pitching/hitting lessons, hotels, etc. You name it, they did whatever they could to support me.

I played softball at two different colleges, 5,000 miles away from home, and they supported me through all the ups and the downs. I realized how much I missed having my parents at my games in college when I wasn’t able to see them every weekend. There is no way that I would be the type of player and person that I am today without them.

I want to end this with what I said in the beginning: Always say thank you to your parents, and never take them for granted. Understand that they make sacrifices for you every single day. There are probably times that they would rather not be at the fields from 6AM-10 PM every single weekend, but they do it because they love you. They do it because they want you to succeed and be the best softball player you can be. Always appreciate them, because they do more for you than you will ever know.