Tag Archives: recruiting

In The Circle- Importance of the Mental Game

The game of softball is full of ups and downs.

There are times when players feel great and on top of the world, and times when they feel the lowest of lows. This is when the mental part of the game comes into play. The crazy part about softball is that if you fail 7-out-of-10 times, you are considered an amazing hitter. Having a strong mental approach is extremely important to succeed.

The biggest mental test I ever had actually happened to me my senior year of college.

I was the only senior pitcher on our team and I wanted to prove to my team and myself that I could handle high pressure situations. I also wanted my senior year to be the best and to go out on a high note.

Our team had just begun Pre-Season, and we were heading to Athens GA, to play the No. 5 team in the country, The University of Georgia. I had a conversation with our head coach the day before we played and she said I was going to get the ball in the first game. Once she told me that, I was all over the place in my head. I wanted to prove to everyone that our team could hang with them, and that I was the right person to be in the circle throwing.

I probably got about an hour of sleep the night before because I was so nervous and anxious. Once I started warming up for the game, the nerves kicked in. I was extremely nervous and I wasn’t confident in myself. When the game started I was completely in my head. Let’s just say, the first inning definitely showed all of this. First pitch of the game, homerun. Second batter walked. Third batter hit a home run. Fourth batter hit a homerun. And then just like that, I was pulled out of the game. I didn’t even get an out.

I remember sitting in the dugout thinking “How did this happen? I am THE senior pitcher on this team. I let my whole team down. How could I do that?”

As I watched the rest of the game, I tried to cheer my teammates on, but I felt like I let them down because I had a bad outing. I have never been harder on myself than how I was after that game.

I spoke to my catcher the next day who said, “J, it is just a game. One performance doesn’t define you as a person. You are an amazing pitcher. Next time you go out there relax, HAVE FUN, and know that you are doing the best you can. Your team supports you 100%.”

Her words really stuck with me and the next two weeks during practice I was able to relax more. During spring break, our team was heading down to Gainesville Florida to play the No. 1 Team in the country, The University of Florida. Before the game, my coaches pulled me aside and said that I was getting the ball again. They said they believed in me 100% and just wanted me to do the best that I could.

My mindset for this game was completely different than the game against Georgia. I told myself that I just wanted to have fun and enjoy every second of pitching. I only had about three more months left to play college softball, and I wanted to soak in every moment. Win or lose, I knew that I had put the work in.

In this game, things were night and day different from the Georgia game. I threw a three hitter, and our team only lost 1-0, which happened to be in the bottom of the 7th inning. That game is the best game that I ever pitched in my whole life.

Regardless of the score, I was so proud of myself and my team that we hung with the best team in the country. It showed me that I deserved to be on the mound, and how important having a strong mental game was.

The Georgia game and Florida game were two weeks apart. In those two weeks I didn’t become a whole new pitcher and change my pitching style. However, I did change my mental approach.

Softball is supposed to be fun; that is why we play. Yes, there will be failures, but it is how you bounce back when things don’t go your way. You can’t dwell on an at-bat that you had from the first inning and let that carry with you into the next inning. You need to have a short memory, and focus on the next pitch and next play. If things aren’t going your way, cheer on your teammates and focus on the things that you can control.

Preparing mentally is just as important – if not more – than any other part of your game. At the end of the day, you only have a certain amount of time to play the game of softball, it is important to enjoy every second you can!

In the Circle- My Love For The Game

Ever since I was five years old, the only thing I ever wanted to do was play Division I Softball. Softball was my life.

At the age of seven, I started pitching and never looked back. I loved the game more than anything. The goal I set for myself as a five year old to play Division I ball was achieved. On top of that, the past four and a half years I have been fortunate enough to stay involved in the sport of Softball by working at the Softball Factory. This sport has given me so many opportunities and the many people I have met in the game has been amazing.

In the Circle will give you a look into the many different parts of Softball and how much this sport impacts you not only on the field but more importantly off the field. Enjoy!

Girls…make sure to always thank your parents. I know you hear this all the time, but I want to make the first “In The Circle” blog about this topic. It is extremely important and something that many people take for granted. I know that growing up I did this at times, however, there is no way I would be where I am today without them.

My dad and I at seven years old on my 8 and Under Rec ball team.

As I mentioned, from a very early age I wanted to play College Softball. I remember when I was seven, I told my dad I wanted to start pitching because I was bored playing other positions. He asked if I would take it seriously because he didn’t want to spend the money on lessons if I didn’t want to practice or care about it. I said I wanted to, and from then on, I was set.

When I started taking pitching lessons, my dad became my catcher. He caught me every single time I needed to pitch. Looking back, those are some of the best times I had with my dad. On certain occasions, we would pitch at 6AM and find a field with lights on, because I knew that we couldn’t pitch later on in the day. Or we would pitch at 10PM before bed because I knew I needed to get a bullpen in. He never ever complained, whether the weather was freezing cold, or extremely hot, or if I wasn’t in the…best mood that day, he was a trooper and was always there for me.

I had been pitching for about a year, when I found out that my dad was diagnosed with Leukemia. As an eight year old, you don’t really understand what that means. In reality, it meant my dad would be in the hospital for 6-to-8 months and it would take close to a year for him to become 100% healthy. This also meant that the catcher I was used to having, wasn’t able to be there. Thinking of my dad not surviving never crossed my mind. Thankfully he beat cancer, and today is as healthy as ever. He actually just celebrated his 20th anniversary of being cancer free this past May.

Reflecting back, there is no way I would be where I am without him and the sacrifices he made. When I was in college and came home for holidays and the summer, my dad would wear full catching gear any time he caught me. It may have looked a bit funny to people walking by, but his response was always “Do you want to try to catch her?” I will cherish the moments and memories I had with my dad forever because they are some of the best times of my life.

When my dad was sick, my mom attempted to catch me. She caught me maybe….three times and then said I was throwing too hard. However, she was my biggest fan, biggest supporter, and knew more about what I was doing incorrectly pitching wise then sometimes I did. She came to all of my games (even if we had Nationals in the hottest places, or had seven games in a day, or had the 8AM game and we had to get up at 5 AM, etc…) She was a trooper through it all.

My parents and I at Mercer. I don’t know where I would be without them.

When I was 12 years old, my family got the news that my mom had Breast Cancer. That was a big shock and a hit to everyone in my family especially after everything my dad went through. This news was difficult since I was in seventh grade, and this time I fully understood what was going on. My mom like my dad is a fighter and has been cancer free for the last 15 years.

Through all of her treatments, she did whatever she could to make sure she was at my games. She tried to go to as many pitching lessons as she could, and tried to stay as involved as possible. I am her #1 fan and she is not only my mom, but my best friend.

Looking back on my career, I don’t know where I would be without the love and support of my parents. Not only are they my heroes, but they always supported my goals and dreams to play softball. They drove me everywhere I needed to go, never complained about not having a “real family vacation,” spent money on new equipment, travel team fees, pitching/hitting lessons, hotels, etc. You name it, they did whatever they could to support me.

I played softball at two different colleges, 5,000 miles away from home, and they supported me through all the ups and the downs. I realized how much I missed having my parents at my games in college when I wasn’t able to see them every weekend. There is no way that I would be the type of player and person that I am today without them.

I want to end this with what I said in the beginning: Always say thank you to your parents, and never take them for granted. Understand that they make sacrifices for you every single day. There are probably times that they would rather not be at the fields from 6AM-10 PM every single weekend, but they do it because they love you. They do it because they want you to succeed and be the best softball player you can be. Always appreciate them, because they do more for you than you will ever know.

Sophomore Rainey Already Drawing Interest From Top College Programs

Savanna Rainey

Basketball is in her blood, but softball is in her heart. She had been playing basketball since kindergarten, but when Savanna Rainey was in the fourth grade she bought a bat and a glove and went to Verona Little League tryouts. The rest of her story is still being written, but there’s no doubt that her talent is going to take her places.

Savanna eventually gave up basketball to play on more competitive travel softball teams and so that she could attend camps across the country. The young catcher’s talents were recognized by Softball Factory coaches at her first College PREP event in 2013 and again at the Softball Factory Christmas Camp and Tournament in December of 2014.

Kristina Hilberth-Wyatt was an On Field Director at the 2014 Christmas Camp and Tournament and was able to evaluate Savanna’s performance. 

“Savanna understands the game, makes good adjustments, and wants to get better every day,” said Hilberth-Wyatt. “Her hard work and passion for the game will have an immediate impact on a talented team.”

The Softball Factory Christmas Camp and Tournament is a high level invite-only event held every year at Historic Dodgertown in Vero Beach, Florida.

“The Softball Factory Christmas Camp was a great experience for me. I appreciated being coached and taught by the highest level of players like Hannah Rodgers,” says Savanna. “I also met a lot of awesome players from all over the country that I continue to stay in touch with. It is fun to watch who is committing and to where.”

Her parents, Andi & Reggie Rainey, echo Savanna’s thoughts: “The Softball Factory Christmas Camp was a great investment. We appreciated how well the camp was run as well as the tournament portion. We loved the one-on-one interaction our daughter received with Lea Ann. We continue to stay in contact with her and she has been helpful in the recruiting process for Savanna.”

Although she cannot officially be recruited until September 1st of her junior year, Savanna has been invited to camps and on unofficial visits by Division 1 programs including Tennessee, Florida, Florida State, the University of Central Florida, Washington and Syracuse.

Senior Director of Softball Factory Lea Ann Jarvis said that she knows Savanna will be very good anywhere she chooses to go.

“I think Savanna will be a great prospect, a great player, anywhere.” Jarvis said. “She’s very athletic, she’s got a great mindset for the game, extremely coachable, does things the right way…in reference to the game and off the field, and she’s got just a really good head on her shoulders.”

College Spotlight – University of Georgia

University of Georgia

Division: NCAA I

Conference: Southeastern

Nickname: Bulldogs

School Size: 36,130

Mailing Address: Athens, GA 30602

Team Site: University of Georgia Softball

Head Coach:

Lu Harris-Champer- lhc@sports.uga.edu

Program Highlights:

    • Coach Harris-Champer enters her 16th season at UGA with a 731-265 record
    • The Bulldogs have made 14-straight NCAA Championship appearances, won two SEC Championships, one SEC Tournament Championship, eight NCAA Regional Championships, and two NCAA Super Regional Championships
    • In the past 16 years UGA has had 24 NFCA All-Americans, 13 Easton All-Americans, 73 All-SEC recognitions, and 54 NFCA All-Region selections
    • Through 15 seasons with Coach Harris-Champer leading them, Georgia has academically produced three CoSIDA Academic All-Americans, 12 CoSIDA Academic All-District selections, and 81 members selected to the SEC Academic Honor Roll
    • During the 2015 season, the Bulldogs set several program records including batting average (.343), runs scored (440), and on base percentage (.420)

Schedule Highlights:

The Bulldogs are 24-3 through their first 27 games in 2016

UGA will begin conference play on March 19 with a three game trip to USC

For information on summer camps at UGA, click here.

For the Bulldogs full 2016 schedule, click here.

More information for recruits can be found here.

College Spotlight – University of Tennessee

University of Tennessee

Division: NCAA I

Conference: SEC

Nickname: Volunteers

School Size: 27,845

Mailing Address: Knoxville, TN 37996

Team Site: University of Tennessee Softball

Head Coaches:

Ralph Weekly- rweekly@utk.edu
Karen Weekly- kweekly@utk.edu

Program Highlights:

    • Since arriving at Tennessee in 2002, the Weekly’s have guided UT to 711 victories, five top three national finishes, and seven appearances in the College World Series
    • In their 14 years with the Volunteers, the Weekly’s have coached 61 All-SEC or All-Freshman selections, 50 All Region selections, and 31 All-American selections
    • Throughout the 2015 season the Vols produced a program-record 100 home runs with five players hitting 10 or more in the
    • In 2015 the Volunteers went 47-17 and made a late-season run that included a runner-up finish in the SEC Tournament and a 5-1 record in NCAA Regionals and Super Regionals play

Schedule Highlights:

The Vols are 16-5 through their first 21 games of the season and have not lost at home thus far

Tennessee will play their first conference games against Arkansas with a three-game home stand starting on March 11

For the Volunteers full 2016 schedule, click here.

To fill out a recruiting questionnaire, click here.